July 8, 2020

Learning to read

“Everywhere I have sought peace and not found it, except
in a corner with a book.
” ― Thomas a Kempis

A not so funny thing happened to me on the way to getting a bachelor’s degree in journalism. I learned to hate reading. That’s right – I hated it. Here I was, a person who supposedly loved words and loved to write, but I didn’t want to read.

There was a good reason for this sorry situation. In college I had to read so many tedious textbooks and spend endless hours at the library poring over boring research materials. The result was that reading became a chore. It wasn’t fun. It was drudgery.

In my young adult years, I read lots of newspapers and magazines. If I read a book it was usually nonfiction. I’d been burned by too many dull pages of stuff I had to pound into my head so I could pass some exam.

My awakening

Now, to me, this should not be. I think an essential part of the educational process should be instilling in people a love of all kinds of written works – fiction, nonfiction, history, current events, etc.

After all, there is tremendous knowledge to be gained from this one simple thing. If we want to keep learning and growing after we complete an education, one of the best ways is through reading.

Fortunately, my aversion to reading dissolved when a friend invited me to his book group. This bunch picked some great books of a wide variety and I had a blast reading and discussing them. A whole new world opened up to me and I haven’t looked back.

Making up for lost time

Nowadays, I’m known to have at least two books going at once – sometimes three or more. I listen to audio books when I walk, read my Kindle every night before I go to sleep, and turn the pages of a paperback whenever I can.

Many of my friends are avid readers and I’m forever pestering them for book suggestions.

I’ve shed my ill-gotten distaste for reading and now I can’t get enough of it.

It’s a good thing, too. I call myself a writer and devote myself to the craft. How can I expect to be good at writing if I don’t read?

I just have one rule, though. If I don’t like a book, I put it down. My days of reading something that bores me are over.

PS: A corollary to this rule is that I can read whatever I want. Right now, in the midst of a pandemic and general worldwide chaos, all I want to read are detective mysteries and courtroom dramas. Thank God for Michael Connelly and John Grisham.

 

Writing spark

Consider keeping a book journal. You can keep one online at Goodreads.com or do it the old-fashioned way in a notebook. The advantage of a website like Goodreads is that you can connect with friends and find out what they’re reading. You can also write book reviews and keep a record of what you’ve read.

 

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